Cross-readings along the axes of Culture:

Refugia [EN] (2002)
Not a retreat, but a space resistant to mono culture in all its social, environmental, libidinal, political, and genetic forms.
Manifesto for the Gynecene [EN] (2015)
Moreover, trying to imagine a future ecology for the whole planetary assemblage, not only a future for the human race, we support the idea that any desirable mode of existence connected/integrated into nature -culture or constituted of equally important organic and inorganic life-forms (including an animistic perspective) cannot be separated from the human subject’s struggle to overcome oppression based on gender, race and class within the species.
Manifesto for the Gynecene [EN] (2015)
Equal and free access to healthcare, lodging, education and to culture should be granted for everyone, at any time of their life.
Manifesto for the Gynecene [EN] (2015)
Technology is a cultural asset and together with the rest of culture, it must be made public, open and free, put to the benefit of emancipating humanity while not destroying everything else around it.
tRANShACKfEMINISt [EN] (2014)
Fed by pornoterrrorism and free culture, we know how to use our claws and teeth if needs be.
Glitch Feminism Manifesto [EN] (2012)
A candidate for an MRes of Visual Culture at Goldsmith’s University, her creative and academic work explores mourning, remembrance, iconography, and idolatry within the public realm.
Cyberwitches Manifesto [EN] (2019)
The forms, structures, images that we manipulate sometimes lead us out of the limits imposed by our culture.
S.C.U.M manifesto [EN] (1967)
Females crave absorbing, emotionally satisfying, meaningful activity, but lacking the opportunity or ability for this, they prefer to idle and waste away their time in ways of their own choosing--sleeping, shopping, bowling, shooting pool, playing cards and other games, breeding, reading, walking around, daydreaming, eating, playing with themselves, popping pills, going to the movies, getting analyzed, traveling, raising dogs and cats, lolling on the beach, swimming, watching T.V., listening to music, decorating their houses, gardening, sewing, nightclubbing, dancing, visiting, "improving their minds" (taking courses), and absorbing "culture" (lectures, plays, concerts, "arty" movies).
S.C.U.M manifesto [EN] (1967)
Having stripped the world of conversation, friendship and love, the male offers us these paltry substitutes: *"Great Art" and "Culture" :* The male "artist" attempts to solve his dilemma of not being able to live, of not being female, by constructing a highly artificial world in which the male is heroized, that is, displays female traits, and the female is reduced to highly limited, insipid subordinate roles, that is, to being male.
S.C.U.M manifesto [EN] (1967)
Absorbing "culture" is a desperate, frantic attempt to groove in an ungroovy world, to escape the horror of a sterile, mindless existence.
S.C.U.M manifesto [EN] (1967)
"Culture" provides a sop to the egos of the incompetent, a means of rationalizing passive spectating; they can pride themselves on their ability to appreciate the "finer" things, to see a jewel where there is only a turd (they want to be admired for admiring).
S.C.U.M manifesto [EN] (1967)
The veneration of "Art" and "Culture" --besides leading many women into boring, passive activity that distracts from more important and rewarding activities, from cultivating active abilities--allows the "artist" to be set up as one possessing superior feelings, perceptions, insights and judgments, thereby undermining the faith of insecure women in the value and validity of their own feelings, perceptions, insights and judgments.
S.C.U.M manifesto [EN] (1967)
The true artist is every self-confident, healthy female, and in a female society the only Art, the only Culture, will be conceited, kookie, funky females grooving on each other and on everything else in the universe.
S.C.U.M manifesto [EN] (1967)
And the more mindless the woman, the more deeply embedded in the male "culture" , in short, the nicer she is, the more sexual she is.
S.C.U.M manifesto [EN] (1967)
On the other hand, those females least embedded in the male "Culture" , the least nice, those crass and simple souls who reduce fucking to fucking, who are too childish for the grown-up world of suburbs, mortgages, mops and baby shit, too selfish to raise kids and husbands, too uncivilized to give a shit for anyone's opinion of them, too arrogant to respect Daddy, the "Greats" or the deep wisdom of the Ancients, who trust only their own animal, gutter instincts, who equate "Culture" with chicks, whose sole diversion is prowling for emotional thrills and excitement, who are given to disgusting, nasty, upsetting "scenes", hateful, violent bitches given to slamming those who unduly irritate them in the teeth, who'd sink a shiv into a man's chest or ram an icepick up his asshole as soon as look at him, if they knew they could get away with it, in short, those who, by the standards of our "Culture" are SCUM...these females are cool and relatively cerebral and skirting asexuality.
The Manifesto of Futurist Woman [EN] (1912)
The whole of humanity has never been anything but the terrain of culture, source of the geniuses and heroes of both sexes.
The Manifesto of Futurist Woman [EN] (1912)
The fecund periods, when the most heroes and geniuses come forth from the terrain of culture in all its ebullience, are rich in masculinity and femininity.
The Mundane Afrofuturist Manifesto [EN] (2013)
The possibilities of a new focus on black humanity: our science, technology, culture, politics, religions, individuality, needs, dreams, hopes, and failings.
Feminist Principles of the Internet [EN] (2016)
We call on the need to build an ethics and politics of consent into the culture, design, policies and terms of service of internet platforms.
Xenofeminist manifesto [EN] (2015)
Its uses are fused with culture in a positive feedback loop that makes linear sequencing, prediction, and absolute caution impossible.
Xenofeminist manifesto [EN] (2015)
0x13 The potential of early, text-based internet culture for countering repressive gender regimes, generating solidarity among marginalised groups, and creating new spaces for experimentation that ignited cyberfeminism in the nineties has clearly waned in the twenty-first century.
Xenofeminist manifesto [EN] (2015)
We ask whether the idiom of 'gender hacking' is extensible into a long-range strategy, a strategy for wetware akin to what hacker culture has already done for software -- constructing an entire universe of free and open source platforms that is the closest thing to a practicable communism many of us have ever seen.
Glitch Manifesto [EN] (2009)
The elitist discourse of the upgrade is a dogma widely pursued by the naive victims of a persistent upgrade culture.
Glitch Manifesto [EN] (2009)
This fatal manner of glitch presents a problem for media and art historians, who try to describe old and new culture as a continuum of different niches.
A Cyborg Manifesto [EN] (1984)
In the traditions of 'Western' science and politics--the tradition of racist, male-dominant capitalism; the tradition of progress; the tradition of the appropriation of nature as resource for the productions of culture; the tradition of reproduction of the self from the reflections of the other - the relation between organism and machine has been a border war.
A Cyborg Manifesto [EN] (1984)
It is also an effort to contribute to socialist-feminist culture and theory in a postmodernist, non-naturalist mode and in the utopian tradition of imagining a world without gender, which is perhaps a world without genesis, but maybe also a world without end.
A Cyborg Manifesto [EN] (1984)
As Zoe Sofoulis argues in her unpublished manuscript on Jacques Lacan, Melanie Klein, and nuclear culture, Lacklein, the most terrible and perhaps the most promising monsters in cyborg worlds are embodied in non-oedipal narratives with a different logic of repression, which we need to understand for our survival.
A Cyborg Manifesto [EN] (1984)
Nature and culture are reworked; the one can no longer be the resource for appropriation or incorporation by the other.
A Cyborg Manifesto [EN] (1984)
By the late twentieth century in United States scientific culture, the boundary between human and animal is thoroughly breached.
A Cyborg Manifesto [EN] (1984)
And many people no longer feel the need for such a separation; indeed, many branches of feminist culture affirm the pleasure of connection of human and other living creatures.
A Cyborg Manifesto [EN] (1984)
Movements for animal rights are not irrational denials of human uniqueness; they are a clear-sighted recognition of connection across the discredited breach of nature and culture.
A Cyborg Manifesto [EN] (1984)
Biological-determinist ideology is only one position opened up in scientific culture for arguing the meanings of human animality.
A Cyborg Manifesto [EN] (1984)
It is certainly true that postmodernist strategies, like my cyborg myth, subvert myriad organic wholes (for example, the poem, the primitive culture, the biological organism).
A Cyborg Manifesto [EN] (1984)
One of my premises is that most American socialists and feminists see deepened dualisms of mind and body, animal and machine, idealism and materialism in the social practices, symbolic formulations, and physical artefacts associated with 'high technology' and scientific culture.
A Cyborg Manifesto [EN] (1984)
And of course, 'women's culture' , like women of colour, is consciously created by mechanisms inducing affinity.
A Cyborg Manifesto [EN] (1984)
The politics of race and culture in the US women's movements are intimately interwoven.
A Cyborg Manifesto [EN] (1984)
Nature /Culture.
A Cyborg Manifesto [EN] (1984)
The dichotomies between mind and body, animal and human, organism and machine, public and private, nature and culture, men and women, primitive and civilized are all in question ideologically.
A Cyborg Manifesto [EN] (1984)
The 'multinational' material organization of the production and reproduction of daily life and the symbolic organization of the production and reproduction of culture and imagination seem equally implicated.
A Cyborg Manifesto [EN] (1984)
The picture is more systematic and involves reproduction, sexuality, culture, consumphon, and producdon.
A Cyborg Manifesto [EN] (1984)
The ethnic and racial diversity of women in Silicon Valley structures a microcosm of conflicting differences in culture, family, religion, education, and language.
A Cyborg Manifesto [EN] (1984)
The culture of video games is heavily orientated to individual compedtion and extraterrestrial warfare.
A Cyborg Manifesto [EN] (1984)
Another critical aspect of the social relations of the new technologies is the reformulation of expectations, culture, work, and reproduction for the large scientific and technical workforce.
A Cyborg Manifesto [EN] (1984)
State: Continued erosion of the welfare state; decentralizations with increased surveillance and control; citizenship by telematics; imperialism and political power broadly in the form of information rich/information poor differentiation; increased high-tech militarization increasingly opposed by many social groups; reduction of civil service jobs as a result of the growing capital intensification of office work, with implications for occupational mobility for women of colour; growing privadzation of material and ideological life and culture; close integration of privatization and militarization, the high-tech forms of bourgeois capitalist personal and public life; invisibility of different social groups to each other, linked to psychological mechanisms of belief in abstract enemies.
A Cyborg Manifesto [EN] (1984)
School: Deepening coupling of high-tech capital needs and public educa-tion at all levels, differentiated by race, class, and gender; managerial classes involved in educational reform and refunding at the cost of remaining progressive educational democratic structures for children and teachers; education for mass ignorance and repression in technocratic and militarized culture; growing and-science mystery cults in dissendng and radical political movements; continued relative scientific illiteracy among white women and people of colour; growing industrial direction of education (especially higher education) by science-based multinationals (particularly in electronics- and biotechnology-dependent companies); highly educated, numerous elites in a progressively bimodal society.
A Cyborg Manifesto [EN] (1984)
But it is not necessary to be uldmately depressed by the implications of late twentieth-century women's relation to all aspects of work, culture, production of knowledge, sexuality, and reproduction.
A Cyborg Manifesto [EN] (1984)
Ambivalence towards the disrupted unides mediated by high-tech culture requires not sorting consciousness into categories of clear-sighted critique grounding a solid political epistemology' *Service Employees International Union's office workers' organization in the US.
A Cyborg Manifesto [EN] (1984)
In retelling origin stories, cyborg authors subvert the central myths of origin of Western culture.
A Cyborg Manifesto [EN] (1984)
Cherrie Moraga (1983) in Loving in the War Years explores the themes of identity when one never possessed the original language, never told the original story, never resided in the harmony of legitimate heterosexuality in the garden of culture, and so cannot base identity on a myth or a fall from innocence and right to natural names, mother's or father's.
A Cyborg Manifesto [EN] (1984)
These are the couplings which make Man and Woman so problematic, subverting the structure of desire, the force imagined to generate language and gender, and so subverting the structure and modes of reproduction of 'Western' idendty, of nature and culture, of mirror and eye, slave and master, body and mind.
A Cyborg Manifesto [EN] (1984)
Chief among these troubling dualisms are self/other, mind/body, culture/ nature, male/female, civilized/primitive, reality/appearance, whole/part, agent/resource, maker/ made, active/passive, right/wrong, truth/illusion, totaVpartial, God/man.
A Cyborg Manifesto [EN] (1984)
High-tech culture challenges these dualisms in intriguing ways.
A Cyborg Manifesto [EN] (1984)
The replicant Rachel in the Ridley Scott film Blade Runner stands as the image of a cyborg culture' s fear, love, and confusion.